Growing Vertical Growing Squash Melons and Cucumbers up a nylon web trellis


Alright! This is John Kohler with Growing
Your Greens and growingyourgreens.com. Today what we’re looking at is the back fence
of my property. And you could kind of see what it was. It was basically a red wood fence
that my neighbor put up and I the side of the fence without the fence board so it actually
was in set, I don’t know if you can really see it now. So things could kind of get in
there and so what we did was actually we put up these refencing material. It’s approximately
I don’t know 20 to 25 dollars for a 16 foot section at your local home improvement store.
So we put that up against the back wall and then what we did you know to maximize the
growing space and to make it look real pretty, is we put this you know once again the nylon
trellis material. So it’s basically a nylon trellis material. It’s really strong and
we put it off like on these cedar wood standoffs. You could see where we attached that to a
cedar wood standoff to give it some space behind so you know we could you know my fingers
could fit behind but more than that also plants and stems could fit behind. So you could see
kinda like how we weaved it up here. We have several things growing over here. We have
actually a winter squash growing and actually here’s a good winter squash here. This is
spaghetti squash here just hanging off the nylon trellis. You could see how we wrapped
the trellis material around the stem of the plant, it goes up and you know I mean this
guy is man that’s definitely about 5 pounds. You know but it’s hanging alright. The trellis
is doing good you could see the trellis kind of getting weighed down but you know this
stuff is real strong it’s nylon doing real good. So we come back maybe once a week and
just you know train the vines up to keep growing up the trellis instead of out into the walkway
and pathway. Besides the winter squash, I think we also have some melons and you could
see some of the melons starting to put on some fruit there. And I think we also did
a cucumber plant or two just for fun. But mostly this is for winter squash I think we
planted mostly spaghetti squash, butternut squash and a acorn squash or two. And you
can see here I have some storage in the back with these sheds so you know it’s a pretty
tight fit. We just left enough for a walkway and we’re gonna actually plan out some things
here in the shaded areas later on. The goal is to have some fruit trees you know every
6 feet and then maybe some kind of shrub in between the big fruit trees but meanwhile,
we wanted to get something growing on this back fence and I think this looks really beautiful
here with all this greenery. You know just along the fence filling in and basically using
otherwise wasted space so definitely you know vertically gardening is the way to go. Here’s
another spaghetti squash here that’s actually getting quite big, real big. And even in the
shaded area back here where I’m at now behind one of these sheds you know the plants aren’t
quite doing as well but you know what’s they get up and grow up higher up to the trellis
I mean now most of the green growth his actually up really high and it’s actually in the
sun. So it’s doing real well and hopefully it will have a bunch of winter squash here
for the winter. Here’s one that’s just starting to grow right there, and the flower.
And also the flowers are edible on the winter squash I ate on the other day and it wasn’t
that tasty but edible nonetheless. I definitely like the blossoms of the summer squash much
much better. So here’s some beautiful blossoms I mean look at these beautiful blossoms there.
O gorgeous. Alright. So that’s John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com and remember you
can grow your own greens.

36 thoughts on “Growing Vertical Growing Squash Melons and Cucumbers up a nylon web trellis

  • August 7, 2009 at 1:15 pm
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    Ya. how do you eat all the different kinds of squash. i thought you had to cook them but if you know a way to eat them raw please tell.

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  • February 15, 2010 at 6:02 pm
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    wonderful garden!!

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  • March 11, 2010 at 4:08 am
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    Melons, Cucumbers, squash and cucumbers can cross pollinate and make some funky eatin. Beware.

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  • March 20, 2010 at 2:35 pm
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    WOW, your plants are so green and beautiful. Do you use fertilizer or compost tea? Thanks for this video. It has given me some ideas. thanks again.

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  • March 20, 2010 at 5:01 pm
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    I grow Primarily in 100% compost and rock dust minerals. I have recently added some organic soil ammendments and compost tea.

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  • March 25, 2010 at 11:48 pm
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    Yes, all the ones I grow can be eaten raw. Its best to use a tool called the spiral slicer to change the texture of the squash to make it easier to digest.

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  • March 25, 2010 at 11:49 pm
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    I eat spaghetti squash raw, just cut it open and start eating! It may not come out in strands as easily when its cooked.

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  • March 29, 2010 at 5:36 pm
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    no major problems. unless there was outside influnce, ie: me, pushing against the vines. I grew butternut squash, and the vines were not broken hanging there.

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  • April 7, 2010 at 10:01 pm
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    Squash flowers are much better fried! (Though I know that's not the healthiest option they are quite delicious!)

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  • April 14, 2010 at 7:58 pm
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    not sure on 20 pound pumpkins. try it and see, or use a wood or metal trellis. Some people make slings to put their pumpkins/melons to take some weight off the vines.

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  • May 24, 2010 at 5:18 pm
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    How did the watermelon turn out? I am growing mine at a 45 degree angle. what did you use to help for the weight of the watermelon?

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  • July 2, 2010 at 3:18 pm
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    from the bottom up. just weave them in and out (up the trellis) and you will be fine. Never any moving and detaching.

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  • December 27, 2010 at 5:34 pm
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    I let nature take its course. IF you wanted to ensure a larger crop, hand polinate. One of my goals is to keep my own bees, so they could increase the polination around here without me doing anything… plus I would get honey, bee pollen and propolis.

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  • February 20, 2011 at 8:54 pm
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    Very cool! Thanks for the ideas & tips. Do the melons ever break from the weight of hanging from a trellis?

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  • March 22, 2011 at 2:29 pm
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    Hi John,

    I see you have some heavy squash hanging down. Would i be able to grow watermelons using a trellis? will the plant be able to support the fruit on its own? Thanks!

    Reply
  • March 23, 2011 at 10:51 am
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    the Greeks take the flowers you spoke of wash them, chop them up & add them to scrambled eggs, they give a nice flavor to your morning meals. My mom used to make small egg pancakes out of the mixture & we'd gobble them up. Try it I know you'll love it 🙂

    Reply
  • April 5, 2011 at 1:14 pm
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    great idea…this helps a lot

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  • April 22, 2011 at 9:56 am
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    It is my personal opinion that you should be the state of California's official city-garden coordinator. But I guess California needs more city gardens first, eh?

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  • April 23, 2011 at 8:53 pm
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    ALRIGHT!

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  • April 24, 2011 at 8:29 am
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    @growingyourgreens When I was in Ukraine last year I saw pumpins and large squash growing 10 feet up on trelises over driveways so it is possable

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  • April 28, 2011 at 7:06 am
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    You always say "we" inn your videos. Who else are you working with and can you introduce us? 😀

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  • May 3, 2011 at 12:29 pm
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    How much space do you have at the bottom? I love this idea. At first I was thinking oh yay I can fit this in my current 10 x 2 raised bed, but actually it looks like I could probably just put a smaller one somewhere else. I have zero yard but I have maybe a foot of space around my apartment. Thanks for the great video!

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  • June 1, 2011 at 3:11 pm
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    I can not find nylon trellis where do you get yours

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  • July 11, 2011 at 5:49 am
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    I've set up something similar to this. But I read somewhere that cucumbers and melons shouldnt be grown in the same bed because they can cross-pollinate. Has anybody heard of this?

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  • July 16, 2011 at 10:53 pm
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    @TheRudyb26 amazon sells them I just got mine from there

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  • May 4, 2012 at 4:45 am
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    Very nice!

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  • July 17, 2012 at 11:10 am
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    john are you a raw fooder or do you cook your squash or what?

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  • August 13, 2012 at 1:37 pm
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    John, I have cantaloupe vines running in the garden and they are doing well however one of my vine with the most melon growing on it broke. Can I graft it or can I simply stick the broken vine in water?

    Please advise. This is my first experience with melons so I'm still learning.

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  • December 31, 2012 at 9:53 pm
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    Thanks, John. There is NO excuse for the people that say they have no room when people see this video. Anyone can grow vertical, if they choose to, no matter where they live. I remember once many years ago I put a sweet potato in a glass of water and I vined it on fish line, all over my kitchen. It was really refreshing and pretty. After awhile I put it in dirt in a pot on the window sill because the potato started to rot. The plant continued growing in my well lit, semi humid kitchen. Fun stuff

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  • April 23, 2013 at 12:33 am
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    John do you have a suggestion on keeping away squash (stink) bugs?

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  • May 4, 2013 at 2:13 am
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    that shouldn't be a problem unless you save the seeds. This years fruit will not be affected.

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  • May 4, 2013 at 7:33 am
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    John,
    How is the plant on the trellis now?
    Do they keep on growing, or all dead?

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  • August 15, 2013 at 5:36 am
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    Cool movies… Supper inspiring. That is the best space saving technique ever… Wow. I started growing vertically .First time gardening. That would be so cool, if you subscribed to my channel : ) Any how. TX.
    [email protected]

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  • April 18, 2015 at 6:18 am
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    Hey John! I am glad I found another great video of yours! I was thinking I was going to run out of space quick in my raised bed. I never knew you can grow squash and melons vertically!

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  • July 16, 2015 at 3:44 am
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    yes it does john

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  • February 24, 2017 at 8:18 pm
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    What type of zucchini is a vine type? Or can any zucchini be trained to grow up off the ground?

    Reply

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